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Athena (tricked you, I bet you thought the caption was going to be moss)

For those of you dear readers who are wondering what all this moss is about and for those dear readers who visit the Fairegarden for the witty repartee in addition to the purty pic-tures, there is indeed an explanation forthcoming. It seems that there are students cruising the internet that are trying to complete an assignment, possibly for a science class of some kind, about moss. Since we are the moss capital of the universe, home to moss mania, voted most mossy, well you get the idea, with our north facing sloping property and seemingly perfect conditions for the moss to grow, with zero efforts on the part of the gardener it must be added, when there is a lull in the garden activity to feature on the blog, a post is published showing pictures of moss. (Whew, English composition teachers, ignore the sentence structure, please. This is our writing style and we hope to not be graded on punctuation, only creativity). The initial post can be viewed by clicking here-Moss Magic.

There is a delightful statistics page on WordPress showing that the original moss post is near the top of total visits to our stories. At first we could not figure out what was going on as it continued to get many hits each day, from google searches, also shown on the stats page, asking for pictures of moss. Finally a comment was left by a sweet girl asking if I knew the names of the moss, for she had a paper to write and needed that information. That was the light shining into the darkness of the mystery of the popularity of the moss post. Another post was written, with new photos, telling the students that we do not know the names of the mosses. It can be viewed by clicking here-More Moss Magic.

We feel doing research is part of the joy of learning and the intent of the teacher was to help these young minds find information on their own, from a variety of sources. We know that the teachers get tired of seeing the same images of moss too, so we will be doing a yearly update with fresh ones. Teachers are our favorite people. While we normally do not place our watermark so boldly in the center of the shot, we want the teachers to know who owns the photos, and maybe even come visit. If you are an instructor and have come to this post via a google search on the name in the photo, please leave a comment. We would love to hear from you.

As of now, for those interested, the post with the most views is Muhly Grass-See You In September, followed by the ever popular Lamb’s Ear Love with the original Moss Magic a close third. I wasn’t going to put the link again for Moss Magic, but I am feeling generous at the moment. Oddly, More Moss Magic is way down the list even though it too contains many nice moss photos. That is the reason for the title and explosively original text. Is it because the word *more* precedes the word *moss* that the google search does not reveal it immediately? We are manipulating the search with this experiment, mentioning the word moss frequently. Let us add it some more just to make sure: moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss
moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mossmoss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss
moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss
moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mossmoss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss moss mosss moss moss moss moss moss moss.

That ought to do it.
Frances

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64 Responses to Moss

  1. Thanks for a hearty laugh at this wee hour Frances. Your photos are indeed purty! I love the last one especially … it is so lovely to see green!! Athena wears it very well. You seem to have waterfall like moss there on your wall… quite the variety abounds in your garden. I love the way moss feels on the palm of my hand… to walk on too. I will have to go google ‘moss’ to see if you come up! LOL!

    Hi Carol, thanks. I am so sorry that you are up so early. Being able to smile at this hour is a great gift, so glad that you have it. For whatever reason, the moss thrives here, even in sunny areas, but especially in the winter. In the summer it goes sort of brown and dormant under the intensity of the sun, but returns as the angle shifts. With the record setting rains this year, it is threatening to engulf the gardens. I don’t mind a bit. As for the google search, if this post doesn’t show up, I have seriously misjudged the process. :-)
    Frances

  2. Autumn Belle says:

    Wow, your picture really brings out the beauty of moss. I used to scrape and throw away any moss I find growing in my garden. Now I’ll look at moss in a whole new light. Anyway, I was quite dizzy after seeing the multiples of repeated moss here but the pictures were a real beauty. I have another suggestion, change ‘comment’ to ‘moss’. (just joking)

    Hi Autumn Belle, thanks. I know that some people google moss because they are trying to get rid of it. It would be an impossible task to eradicate it here, requiring a whole lot of chemicals that bring a shudder just thinking of them. The moss would win every time anyway. We love the look and feel of that green velvet and believe it adds the atmosphere of medieval forests into our center city environment. We know it can be slippery, especially on brick pathways, but we have gravel pathways for the most part. The step stones have not been colonized by it, maybe the foot traffic keeps it at bay. Sorry about the moss repeats at the end. It seems that I did not know when enough was enough. :-)
    Frances

  3. gardeningasylum says:

    Those kids are in for a treat – especially that knockout photo with all the heuchera!

    Thanks GA. It is the teachers that I am hoping enjoy the new photos. The Athena hill is an interesting part of the garden. You might be able to see that under the moss is a carpet of Sedum acre, naturally occurring, that comes to the front in the warmer months. It has a yellow bloom in spring that could not be duplicated by human gardening, a true wall of yellow. Then in the fall the sedum recedes and the moss is revealed.
    Frances

  4. Darla says:

    I remember you posting about the students doing research…and you know I LOVE your wall with the moss in the crevices!! You captured these different types of moss in detail…just wonderful!

    Thanks Darla. The wall is beginning to fill in with the moss, especially with all this moisture. I have been borrowing pieces from the wall to top my bonsai pots, knowing it will grow right back. It is nice to have an unlimited supply of it. :-)
    Frances

  5. Edith Hope says:

    Dear Frances, I was amused and informed [and I am not a student!] by this posting.

    Seriously, I do feel that there is a place for moss in the garden. I love to see it lining the cracks between the flagstones of a path and taking a hold on garden ornaments. I loved Athena. May I steal her?!!

    Hi Edith, thanks. There has to be a place for the moss here, it is out of our control! Glad to hear you can appreciate it as well. Now about Athena, we have grown quite attached to her. She is our companion as we sit on the deck in the summer and in our view from inside in the winter. We would miss her terribly, so no, you may not. :-)
    Frances

  6. Wow, I wish that I had the internet when I was a student. How much easier to goggle then to go to the library and open a million books.
    I so love moss as well. At my front there is a very shady (and damp) spot with a lot of moss growing in with the grass. Now making it my lifes mission to weed out all the grass, while encouraging the moss.
    Don’t you just love WordPress stat page!

    Hi Deborah, thanks for visiting. The internet does make writing papers and doing research a whole different ball game. We did love going to the library and using the resources of the time to find those magazine articles and books. It was a good learning experience and helped teach the method of following steps to gain knowledge. It is almost too easy today, and some lessons are lost in the world of instant gratification I believe. But I use the interent every day myself, so cannot judge it harshly. Moss is a magical substance, especially in winter with the bright greens amidst the greys and browns. I am addicted to the stats page, clicking on everything to see where it leads. :-)
    Frances

  7. lynn'sgarden says:

    LOL, Frances! I tried to count how many times you typed moss but my eyes kept getting crossed!! I do have a new appreciation for this woodland wonder…mainly thanks to you! Have a wonderful weekend!

    Hi Lynn, thanks, I hope you did not suffer brain damage from trying to count the moss words! The funny thing is that we are not a woodland at all, but a very exposed sunny open site with one not that large multi trunk maple tree. It is the north facing slope that allows the moss to flourish, even in full sun at that angle. There is a lesson of some sort there about earth moving to suit one’s needs. You too enjoy the weekend. We might be submerged under this plentiful rain, and others will be under feet of snow so we are not complaining. Maybe just a wee bit, not really. :-)
    Frances

  8. Teresa O says:

    Ohhh…there she is again, the lovely Athena in her bed of moss. Yes, moss is a wonderful thing, so soft and kind of furry. What a fun project to be discovering the world of moss, plus there’s so many things you can do with moss. Moss gives an aged look to rocks, pots, and landscapes. There…I’ve added to your moss count in a mossy kind of way.

    Fun post, Frances!

    Thanks Teresa. I appreciate your addition to the moss count. I suppose that comments count in the google thingey, for I have found my own comments on other blogs come up when googling things. That is always a surprise. :-)
    Frances

  9. Lisa at Greenbow says:

    I bet those students will wonder what that lumpy plant is in with the moss around Athena. I love seeing your moss. You have quite the collection. There is a little bit of moss here. Such fun to find it growing here and there.

    Hi Lisa, thanks. Who knows what the young minds of today think when they see stuff? Their existence in this world is so different, so high tech with instant information and communication continuously with texting, tweeting and cell phones in the hands of toddlers. My mind cannot wrap around the change from our own experience as a student.
    Frances

  10. Randy says:

    Frances,
    Could it be you have been drinking a bit too much coffee? Fun post too. I have been seeing a lot of moss poking out of the snow.

    Hi Randy, HA. I limit myself to one cup of coffee a day. Now that cup is 32 oz, but it is only one cup to me. I was feeling silly when writing this post, it seems. We are getting rain instead of the mass quantities of snow forecast in other areas. The moss loves it. :-)
    Frances

  11. Joy says:

    Frances girl I am a big fan of MOSS !! So this is a “perfect post” for me and how beautiful is Athena surrounded by the loving green comfort zone of moss ?
    I am working or grooming my moss all the time that I can .. as soon as we thaw here I will be admiring it and telling it to grow moss ! GROW !! LOL
    Joy : )

    Hi Joy, thanks for stopping by. Glad to hear you are a moss fan too. Weeding the moss is a very zen experience. It forces us to slow down and see things. I have one area that gets weeded, sometimes, in the summer, for it is one of our only shady spots. Sitting on a padded kneeling cushion and taking our time is a good way to spend time in the garden in the heat of our summers.
    Frances

  12. gittan says:

    That’s a lot of MOSS “LOL”

    Hi Gittan, thanks. You are so right, on several levels. :-)
    Kram,
    Frances

  13. Les says:

    We have a local biology teacher who assigns her students a leaf ID project every spring. The kids usually come to the garden center with their parents. Initially they would grab a hold of one of my employees who would take them around and show them 30-40 trees and shrubs, while other customers may be waiting for help too. For many of the parents this is their first time in the store. Not that I am a curmudgeon, but I have instructed my people to now only point in the direction of the trees and let the kids do their own work. Maybe if the parents bought more I would feel differently.

    …and another thing. Some friends of mine went to Japan this fall and were abel to get an appointment to see the famous moss garden in Kyoto. If you’re interested here is a link to someone else’s photos.

    http://www.phototravels.net/kyoto/zen-gardens-saiho-ji.html

    Hi Les, thanks for that link. It was such a peaceful place, full of zen. My garden is not very zen like, even the zen garden. There is too much going on here, and even though I try to edit it down and simplify the plantings, nature has other ideas. As for the parents and students, I agree, they should not have helpers when paying customers are waiting. The joy of learning is the discovery for yourself, not just getting it done. I am feeling curmudgeony today too.
    Frances

  14. Makes me go ‘gog’ eyed staring at the moss text.

    Please let us know the results, ha, ha.

    Everybody needs a little moss in their life

    Sorry Rob. I went gog typing it. We just did the google search and this did not show up at all with the word moss as the search. Fairegarden moss brought the first moss post, followed by the next one. Maybe it is too recent to show up. All that gogging for naught? HA
    Frances

  15. Gail says:

    You do have a prodigious amount of moss…It’s beautiful…and one of my top twenty favorite plants/plantings/things found in your garden…It’s just astonishing how happy it is on your hill. I especially appreciate how you broke up the moss ode into stanzas…It was much easier to read. xogail

    Thanks Gail, you have seen the conquering moss firsthand and know it’s power! HA There was a pattern to the moss ode, but the publishing did not reflect the spacing and I didn’t feel like tweaking it yet again, dadburn it. :-)
    Frances

  16. Oh moss. Was a cat sitting on your keyboard, LOL? I, too, love moss and you sure have a lot of it. The macros are especially fascinating! Mossy mossings, Mossica

    Hi Mossica, I really like that name for you! While the cats do sometimes walk across my laptop, they prefer my husband’s desktop keyboard and can come up with some strange things. Kitty is especially adroit. Glad you like the moss too. You must come see it for yourself sometime! You would turn green. Not from envy, but the moss would start to grow on you. HA :-)
    Frances

  17. Rosey says:

    Beautiful photos, Frances! We get very little moss in our yard. Too dry here. But the north side of the house gets a little in the pathways and grass if it rains. ( we get about ten inches of rain a year.)
    You ever see the IT Crowd? One of my favorite characters on there is named Moss. He is a huge nerd…and I love him!

    Hi Rosey, wow, you are dry there! Even when we were in extreme drought conditions for two years, we got more rain than that. At least you have the spores, or whatever it is that causes moss to grow. I don’t remember that show, but love the name Moss. :-)
    Frances

  18. kate says:

    I’m going to have moss, and more moss, on the brain all day long. Might you think about composing an ode to moss? Athena could figure prominently ~ thanks for the morning laugh!

    Hi Kate, thanks. So nice to see you. I got moss on the brain from writing the word moss so many times too. Maybe the next year’s moss post could be in the form of a poem. Thanks for the idea! :-)
    Frances

  19. Janet says:

    My goodness, what a mossy world. I do like Athena with her moss and Heuchera. I keep trying to get my neighbor to embrace his moss as his yard has more moss than grass. I say go with the flow!

    Hi Janet, thanks. I hope your neighbor will go for the mossy look too. Many lawn lovers hate it though, and constantly do battle. It is much easier to give in and learn to love it. :-)
    Frances

  20. Steve says:

    Moss. Hilarious post Frances, but also absolutely beautiful, too. Moss. I once made a Moss garden right in my own living room, living in Vancouver, BC. Moss. It was amazing how many little seeds and stuff came up – moss – everything from maples to Bleeding Hearts, I swear (Moss). I can see you are a master of the SEO sweepstakes – moss.

    Hi Steve, thanks for the back up moss words! HA Your moss garden sounds great, I love seeing the bleeding hearts come up through it and usually leave them. The maple seedlings are much too plentiful. We would be a forest in no time. Although the squirrels prefer a forest of walnuts to be the future here. I don’t know what SEO means. :-)
    Frances

  21. Sylvia (England) says:

    Frances, love moss, adore your photos and had a good laugh! Google will probably ignore this post, it assumes that you are trying to manipulate it! It will only count the number of times a word appears when it is used in a paragraph, which is why the first paragraph is the most important to hold key words. Google’s methods are very complex and mostly secret. But we your readers enjoyed it!

    Best wishes Sylvia (England)

    Thanks for letting me know about the google safeguards, Sylvia. It was worth a try, but I was thinking of some of the spam that wordpress catches that uses certain words over and over and how annoying that is. Serves me right. I should rewrite this and make the first paragraph loaded. Next time. :-)
    Frances

  22. Sweet Bay says:

    DH asked if this was in the Pacific Northwest when he first saw the pictures.

    Why are so many students writing papers about moss??

    HA Sweet Bay, with all the rain we have been getting, you would think this was the PNW. Who knows why assignments of moss, other than it is plentiful and apparent in the winter, here anyway. You can see the bright green patches along the side of the roads everywhere.
    Frances

  23. Moss is very cool. I’ve been tempted to put together a small terrarium with moss as its central element. After our rainy year last year I have more moss that ever. I guess I’m not a rolling stone!

    Hi Dave, thanks, that would be cool. The girls would love to touch it. I thought about incorporating that song, Papa was a rolling stone, into the post, but discarded the idea. You are definitely not a rolling stone! :-)
    Frances

  24. lotusleaf says:

    Hi Frances! First it was grass, which astonished me, and now it is moss which stuns me! Beautiful photos! The students are lucky.

    Hi Lotus, thankss. I am so glad you like the moss. It has a magic and requires us to get down close, slow our breathing and really look at it, a good thing. :-)
    Frances

  25. Phillip says:

    The moss is beautiful!

    Hi Phillip, thanks. I have been wondering how you were doing with this insane weather. Oh how we long for spring, and sunshine. :-)
    Frances

  26. linda says:

    Hmmm. . . I’m not sure I remember what this post was about. . . oh yeah, moss!!!! I love it Frances. You’ve certainly got some beautiful examples.

    The Lawn Man used to power wash it off the pavers here, as he preferred them looking all fresh and new all the time. I’ve since convinced him to leave the moss alone. I’m not sure he appreciates its beauty, character, and aged look it gives the pavers, but he seems to appreciate the ‘excuse’ to save the work, effort, and water. Thankfully, now he leaves the moss alone.

    Hi Linda, thanks so much. Moss on walkways is not a good things, it is so slippery! But in between pavers is a nice look. Glad your husband finally decided to let the moss win the battle. :-)
    Frances

  27. Way cool pics. My top google search hit is wood chip mulch probably followed by ragweed. The runners up are on the amusing fetish end of the spectrum.

    Thanks Christopher. I would think you would get a lot of hits for cozy cabin. But that’s just me. The ragweed makes sense, people wanting to ID it. I might even have googled and visited you. HA :-)
    Frances

  28. suburbangarden says:

    Maybe I should post a photo I took last fall of my moss. I could entitle it “Moss.” Think that would work? I do love moss, the way it feels, how interesting its textures, and how cool it looks up close.

    I think you should entitle it Kate Moss. There are a whole lot of people looking for her. HA :-)
    Frances

  29. Jen says:

    I do admit, I am mad for moss. And I think that this should just about be enough to make me very happy. LOL.

    Jen

    Thanks Jen. You would be happy here, it is everywhere. :-)
    Frances

  30. Nell Jean says:

    Marvelous post. Great photos. Fun topic.

    I encourage moss here, especially on my stones. Moss loves acidity — but you already knew that. Moss loves compacted soil. I encourage little ‘moss lawns’ under the oaks where nothing wants to grow.

    Oh, I forgot to say my most picked topic is ‘How to hem blue jeans.’

    Thanks Nell Jean. It is a little bit of fluff for a rainy winter’s day. :-)
    Frances

  31. Jen says:

    Oh, I’m enjoying your past and present moss photos, Frances. (I can’t wait for my kids to do some moss reports so I can send them to your site!) I was thinking about doing a moss post as well, but when I really got down to it, there only seem to be two varieties at my house – interest would run out fast. We’re doing an afterschool gardening class and are thinking about doing some moss terrariums. You’ve given me some nice ideas.

    Thanks Jen. The moss projects will be fun for the kids, most of them love the stuff. :-)
    Frances

  32. Well, they are definitely going to the right place…your blog! I love your photos. They are so close up and crystal clear. That is nice you are opening up your garden to the teachers/students.

    Hi Amy, thanks. That is so sweet of you. Not too big on facts, but lots of pictures. They can take it from there. The teachers are always welcome, we have some in the family who use the blog to teach sometimes. That makes me incredibly happy. :-)
    Frances

  33. Melissa says:

    As a designer, I was really struck by the photo of Athena with the moss and the heuchera – fabulous combination – at the end. I have too many clients who want moss OUT of their gardens whereas I welcome mine wherever it appears. Thanks for revisiting this great topic!

    Hi Melissa, thanks. Athena is always popular when she is shown on the blog. We love seeing her as well. So many people, mostly men with lawn fetishes don’t like moss at all. Glad to hear you have the welcome mat out for it. It adds so much personality to a space. :-)
    Frances

  34. Ha! Loved this. I have no business growing moss in the desert but I do.. It’s fun to wiggle me toss in some cool, damp Irish moss.

    Wow, Kate, moss in the desert! I would need some moss there as well. Just a wee bit. :-)
    Frances

  35. Gloria Bonde says:

    We have beautiful moss growing on some shady spots on Harney Peak, 7242ft. The highest mountain in the area here in SD. It is lovely. But, alas where we live it is to arid to grow. I grow carpet thymes to wiggle my toes in.

    Hi Gloria, thanks for visiting. Wow, that is high up there! I bet it’s beautiful too. You know I love the carpet thymes as well, but watch out for the bees when you wiggle your toes in it! :-)
    Frances

  36. goodtogrow says:

    I miss moss. This post totally cracked me up!

    Thanks, glad you enjoyed the light heartedness. We really are awash in the stuff here. I would miss it too.
    Frances

  37. I was just petting the moss growing in between my front walk flagstones. Of course, when summer comes, it will be scorched! I love the emerald stuff!

    With today’s rain, there will be more moss.

    Cameron

    Hi Cameron, that sounds delightful. Sweet moss, pretty moss, pet pet. It does sort of dry up in the hot and dry, especially the drought years we had a couple of years ago. But it always comes back strong in the winter. This is probably its peak month right now and we have more than ever. So much rain. Not complaining, though, not complaining. :-)
    Frances

  38. Joanne says:

    Frances an excellent post I remember an earlier one on Moss which I also enjoyed. You have far more varieties of Moss than I do here.
    Also your tips on searches were good although perhaps a little late. I have been trying to figure out how to get into Google alerts for my Looking at Lyme Disease blog particularly for ones such as ME/CFS, Fibromyalgia and Arthritis. I figure people who know they have Lyme Disease will soon learn where to look for information but others with symptoms similar to the ones I had may like me spend years oblivious to their cause. More importantly they would also be oblivious to the political corruption still going on over the review process of the IDSA Guidelines, quite unbelievably frightening.

    As to Google Alerts I tried e mailing for advice but no reply and now I am finding some posts get in others don’t and time of day has some affect so your multiple mentions of Moss may be another pointer.

    If you have any other suggestions they would be greatfully recieved in the interests of disseminating as much information about Lyme disease to a wider population.

    I have for a change left you my other blog link and would be interested in your comments.

    Hi Joanne, thanks. We do have a lot of different mosses, but one has to get quite close to snap the photo then load it on the computer to see the differences. I don’t know the answer to directing searches to your posts. All that moss repeated did not seem to help. Sylvia said it has to be used in a paragraph and in the first paragraph at that. Maybe you could give it a try. I agree that your site would be of great interest to anyone with those symptoms and should be near the top on the google search. I will check out your link when time allows and leave a comment. Thanks for leaving it. :-)
    Frances

  39. You posted on moss (a great variety, there!) and MMD posted on lichen. I’m lichen them both! ;-)

    Hi Shady, thanks. I am glad you lichen the moss and agree, MMD had a beauty. :-)
    Frances

  40. Lisa says:

    BEAUTIFUL moss pictures! It’s nice to see green this time of year, and mosses are cool anytime, IMO! :)

    Hi Lisa, thanks. The moss is the greenest thing here at the moment, with a lot of yellow tones that grab the eye. I love looking at it. :-)
    Frances

  41. deborahelliott says:

    I have lots of hits on my “Moss path in the woodland garden” post. Maybe this is why! I have a real fondness for moss. I love your photos.

    Hi Deborah, thanks. Your post sounds delightful, I can see why it would get lots of hits from a diverse group of searches. :-)
    Frances

  42. What a delightful, mossy post, Frances! I remember the first post and it’s actually one of my favourites because I too love moss. Your photos are especially astonishing in this post. Or is that amossing? Moss moss moss.

    Thanks Jodi. The moss gives a warm fuzzy feeling, maybe more of a cool fuzzy actually. Glad you like seeing the photos. They look so alive at a time when there is so much grey and brown.
    Frances

  43. Catherine says:

    I love all the moss shots, but I think Athena in the bed of moss is my favorite! I was working on our stone edging and noticing lots of moss yesterday, I love the character it adds.

    Hi Catherine, thanks so much. Athena likes being surrounded in the soft blanket. Without the moss, that piece of ground would surely have washed down onto the paths, with Athena riding the waves! :-)
    Frances

  44. Grace says:

    Beautiful moss photos, Frances although I might have to take issue with yours being the mossiest place on the planet. LOL I’m not complaining because I love the stuff but if I’m not careful it will swallow the house. Now wouldn’t that be a sight?

    Thanks Grace. I was waiting for the challenge to the claim of mossiest, figuring it would come from your area. We have had so much more rain than in the recent past, we might surpass even the Pacific Northwest for the green verdure. I seem to remember a movie where everything was covered in moss, the house and even the farmer and it attacked a truck and its inhabitants, thought it was Twilight Zone, but couldn’t find it. Have you ever seen that? It is possible here too. :-)
    Frances

  45. Sunny says:

    Haa haa. Lovely post. Nice pictures too.I

    Hi Sunny, thanks and welcome. I am glad you liked the moss. I am in love with your willow structures!!! :-)
    Frances

  46. Kiki says:

    A Wonderful celebration of moss..how can anyone not love it..it simply is magical! Beautiful post! Lovely!
    Kiki~

    Thank you Kiki. Moss appeals to the senses on every level. :-)
    Frances

  47. Tatyana says:

    Good morning Frances! Hello to your gorgeous moss from our PNW moss! If you ever need a moss reinforcement, we’ll send you some. But it looks like you are well-moss-equipped!

    Thanks Tatyana. Our moss says *Hi* back! I believe our conditions are similar in some ways, when we are not in drought years. Our little finger of the Tennessee River Valley has rainfall in normal years the same as the PNW. Why this small area has this weather phenomena is beyond me, but we like it! :-)
    Frances

  48. Hi Frances – your post really made me chuckle! You have an amazing array of mosses, I’m really quite envious! We have lots of moss too …. it’s masquerading as our lawn! :)

    HA Liz, your comment made me chuckle as well, thanks! Good one! :-)
    Frances

  49. Rose says:

    Ah, Frances, I can always count on you to give me a chuckle in the morning:) Just a few weeks ago I was subbing in an English class supervising students doing research in the computer lab. I had to remind one student that “googling” his term was not the best way to do scholarly research, but I may have to re-think my opinion. Anyone wanting to know more about moss could learn a lot by visiting FaireGarden! I’d like to know if you hear from any students.

    By the way, I have hung up my red pen for the most part, but the punctuation in that sentence looked fine–rather Faulkernesque in style:)

    I agree with whoever suggested writing an ode to moss with Athena’s photo accompanying it–maybe an idea for next Garden Muse Day?

    Hi Rose, thanks for that. I appreciate the support, for I am never sure about what is correct on the comma front, but do tend to go on and on, running sentences together when an end and new beginning would much better suit the situation. Athena will be featured many more times. Under the moss is a native low growing sedum acre that was here when we began the garden. It will bloom in spring with a solid yellow carpet of bloom, like a velvet robe for dear Athena. Note to self, take a picture of it and write a poem. :-)
    Frances

  50. joey says:

    Dear Frances ~ many thanks for your continued mossy wit and purty pic-tures!

    Thank you dear Joey, mossily appreciated! :-)
    Frances

  51. “Most Mossy”… love it! Nothing hides key stone blocks better than moss.

    Hi Jenn, thanks for visiting and welcome! Thanks too for that security hint. :-)
    Frances

  52. Rosie says:

    Oh Frances that was funny! I loved your different types of moss too – lots of them I’ve never seen before – no wonder your moss has been a popular search. I think its great that our blogs give students access to different material for their projects hence the reason I too am keeping a journal of local flora and fauna in our immediate area too along with the unknown areas of scenic beauty not mentioned in the tourist brochures here.

    and since the search engines also search the comments section I’ll help you along too with a little moss, moss,moss ,moss , moss, moss , moss, moss, moss, moss, moss and Moss, Moss, Moss, Moss, Moss……….. I’m going to be seeing moss in my sleep tonight he hee :)

    Thanks Rosie. I appreciate the added mosses, but that experiment must be deemed a failure. Sadly, google is aware of such childish tricks and filters them out of the calculations. But it was worth a try. Good for you offering info not found elsewhere. I believe we should all try to offer occasional useful tidbits for the non garden blogging public out there. :-)
    Frances

  53. Hahahahaha! I love moss; thanks for sharing

    Thanks Helen, glad you enjoyed it. :-)
    Frances

  54. Town Mouse says:

    Sorry, Frances. Living in the hometown of Google, I have to tell you that how often a word appears in a post does not a high ranking make. They have whole buildings full of people (who listened to their math teachers) figuring out clever algorithms. Well, the food is great, and the pay is good. No, I don’t work there but got perilously close. Twice.

    Aside from that: Great post! Love the moss with the heuchera. Now I’m thinking I should really do a moss post myself, while we have the rains… It won’t last.

    Thanks for that, Town Mouse. I suspected as much. Great food and good pay would tempt anyone! Glad to hear that moss will grow for you as well. It is not something I remember from our time living in southern CA. Your conditions must be vastly different up north. :-)
    Frances

  55. Blossom says:

    Goodness .. I’m seeing ‘moss’ all over … I think I need a … moss!

    HA Blossom, thanks for getting into the right frame of mind! :-)
    Frances

  56. Hilarious! Best of luck with the search engine optimization. I’m checking out your pictures and camera suggestions – just tried to take pictures of our amazing 2 feet of snow and was sorely disappointed. Thanks for the moss. Kelly

    Hi Kelly, thanks, but it seems like google is not fooled by such shenanigans. Oh well, it was just for fun, and however the students are getting here, they continue to visit I believe, from the stats that WordPress shows. Still going to Moss Magic, the first post the most often. I wonder if it might be on facebook as a source? Snow, with all that glaring white is very difficult to capture, for me anyway. It glistens and glitters but my camera, or my lack of skill, cannot show it.
    Frances

  57. commonweeder says:

    Frances – I enjoyed this so much, especially your appreciation of the teacher’s intentions, and the help you are giving teachers and students. For me this post came right after a GWA workshop when there was lots of discussion about SEOs from Richard Banfield and Freshtilledsoil.com, which isn’t really about gardening, but the cultivation we are all trying to do in cyberspace. thank you so much.

    Hi Pat, thanks for that. I finally googled SEO to see what you and others were talking about. Duh. I should have done some research first before causing brain damage from writing the word moss so many times. Well I did write three lines then copy and pasted the rest. It was just for fun anyway. The hits on the first moss post continue, without it showing up at all on the google search. Maybe facebook has something? Who knows, but we have a lot of pretty moss growing here that needs to be shown on the blog. That is really my motivation for any blog post, sharing what is going on in the garden. :-)
    Frances

  58. Lola says:

    Wow, that is a lot of moss. I like the way it is in the wall. And you have so many different kinds.
    Have you ever found enough in the woods that you could walk on it? It’s so cool & soft on the feet. Sometimes it will tickle too.
    Way to go Frances. Students should do research. That is how they learn.
    Couldn’t count the number of word—crossed my eyes.

    Hi Lola, thanks. We don’t have any woods at this house, but did at our other TN home. But the floor of that forest was covered in leaves all the time. The rocks were always mossy though. Oh how I miss that place! Sigh.
    Frances

  59. Anna says:

    What an excellent post and humorous post I mosst say Frances. Our front garden is north facing too so we get a lot of the stuff too. Still it’s pleasant to look at and to stroke too :)

    Thanks Anna. Glad to hear you have the wealth of moss too. We feel very lucky to have it here, although some neighbors curse it in their lawns. Lawns, what a concept. HA :-)
    Frances

  60. Jake says:

    Very interesting! Also thanks for the nice pictures showing off how beautiful Moss can be.

    Jake

    Thanks Jake. The moss is exquisite, so full of mystery and magic and moisture. We love it. :-)
    Frances

  61. James A-S says:

    Everybody else has said everything already…too late.
    Drat, Drat and Double Drat.

    Hot moss shots, Frances

    HA James, you, at a loss for words? Highly doubtful, but thanks for stopping by and the nice compliment. :-)
    Frances

  62. Very sophisticated SEO techniques, Frances!

    (And some great moss photos, too. I need to establish my own moss garden before it gets too dry. I envy you your climate.)

    Thanks Pomona. According to some google insiders, my tricks will not produce the desired results. But it was fun trying. We can have drought here, but this year has been very wet. I remember that you had a moss garden, good for you! :-)
    Frances

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